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Snorkel FAQ's
Airflow Snorkels deliver air where it is needed.
Fuel efficiency, economy and getting the most out of the vehicle is what Airflow Snorkels aim to achieve, as well as being able to go through that river crossing.
To this end Airflow has been conducting airflow, friction loss and performance testing on their products and other air induction manifolds for many years.
Why do we need more air?
Your engine needs air and fuel to make it work.
More air and oxygen going into the engine means more efficient combustion. When the air is taken from under the bonnet / hood or the wheel arch, the air is hotter than the air that is collected by a snorkel at roof level. The hotter the air, the less available oxygen there is for efficient combustion.
How does it work?
Air is taken in at roof level where the air is less disturbed, contains less contaminants from the road and traffic conditions and is cooler than air from the engine bay or at ground level.
Airflow have now released a snorkel for the 200 series Landcruiser, both petrol and diesel models. Extensive testing was undertaken on this vehicle and the results show a marked improvement in performance. This has been evidenced by more power and torque and improved fuel economy.
The testing involved creating an airflow onto the snorkel whilst the vehicle was on a dyno. The dyno test simulated driving speeds up to 145 Klms/hr and a variable speed centrifugal fan created airflow at comparable speeds. The test results showed increased torque and power up to speeds of 95 Klms/hr, after which the performance leveled off. An additional test was to monitor the fuel economy on a long trip with a vehicle carrying 6 passengers and towing a campervan. This test indicated an improvement of approximately 8% in fuel consumption.
What is the difference between snorkel brands on the market?
Price and looks. Technically?? Zero. They are all engineered to deliver air from the windscreen weight. The new range of airflow snorkels delivers a minimum of 180% of free air to the inlet.
Your engine needs air and fuel to make it work.
More air and oxygen going into the engine means more efficient combustion. When the air is taken from under the bonnet / hood or the wheel arch, the air is hotter than the air that is collected by a snorkel at roof level. The hotter the air, the less available oxygen there is for efficient combustion.
When the Airflow counts
During the past 18 months, Gibson RM have undertaken a review of all of their product lines and have committed to a substantial redesign and testing regime which has resulted in more efficient and aesthetically appealing snorkels for a wide range of 4WD vehicles.
The program is ongoing and includes re-developing some older models and development of new models for the local Australian market and for overseas markets.
AIRFLOW have released a snorkel for the new 200 series Landcruiser. Extensive testing involved creating an airflow onto the snorkel whilst the vehicle was on a dyno. The dyno test simulated driving speeds up to 145 Klms/hr and a variable speed centrifugal fan created airflow at comparable speeds. The test results showed increased torque and power up to speeds of 95 Klms/hr, after which the performance leveled off. An additional test was to monitor the fuel economy on a long trip with a vehicle carrying 6 passengers and towing a campervan. This test indicated an improvement of approximately 8% in fuel consumption.
Why do Airflow snorkels use existing inlets rather than new adaptors and fittings?
The fewer join points the better, sealing the minimum openings on an air box reduces the risk seepage. Usually the original Design of the air entry into the air box has been made to maximize the air swirl. Should you change the point of air entry you will not optimize the air efficiency.
What is the best Design of a snorkel?
A shape that resembles a smooth flowing tube that contour its way from the Air Entry point to the Air box. That shape should be a snug fit against the guard and “A” Pillar, all Airflow Snorkels adhere to this Design Principle.
Snorkels that stick out from the “A” Pillar will cause tree branches and other pieces of debris to interfere with the body work and may cause damage to the vehicle when using off road.
Does the size of the snorkel make any difference?
Yes. The bigger engines found in the GU and 100 series range requires more air than the previous models. Airflow snorkels have developed the technology for these models, and have designed a 3.5” delivery system giving your engine more than the competitor’s 3” systems.
What Material is Airflow Snorkels made from and does the material make any difference?
Airflow Snorkels are made from Virgin Polyethylene powder. Virgin powder means that it has not been used before in a Rotormoulding process. Recycled materials can be result in warpage of the snorkel, discolourization over time and crazing of the surface. Therefore Airflow snorkels have chosen the most advanced polyethylene on today’s market.
Is the “A” Pillar Mount strong enough?
The “A” Pillar on any vehicle forms an integral part of the construction and strength of the vehicle itself. The snorkel is securely fixed to the vehicle long the guard by 3 mount points, the “A” Pillar is only a fixing point for the Head of the snorkel. If you use the pillar as a mounting point (i.e. with up to 4 mount holes) you will weaken this point in the car and it may result in cracked windscreens and cracking in the pillar itself. The snorkel and the “A” pillar should break away from the vehicle and not cause the “A” pillar roof and door to be effected by the impact.
Does the Airflow hat have Water Separation and Drainage?
The Airflow hat has total Water Separation and Drainage. The design of the hat is for any moisture in the air inflow to be forced to the inside surface of the hat, water slots on the hat to allow the water to drain to the outside of the snorkel body.
Should l put my air ram on backwards to stop water and other contaminates from entering the airbox?
Yes you can, if your concerned about wash from a river crossing. It is not recommended that you run your vehicle above 25km/h with the air ram on backwards, as it causes damage to your vehicle.
Use of cyclone separator in harsh conditions
Where the environmental conditions are such that vision is impaired by dust, rain snow or bugs a cyclone separatornon ram type should be used.
This will not damage the engine duct and flow restrictions. The use of this type of separator will however reduce performance and economy.
Not all air rams are equal in performance.
·         Close proximity to a bonnet / hood
·         A foil / curved top on the air ram
·         Turning the air ram away from the direction of travel
·         Where the air ram design makes the air go back on itself at an angle greater than 100°
In general air rams need an open face preferably with out a screen (which deflects airflow). Any deflection of the incoming airflow can dramatically affect the efficiency and the output.
This can be caused by:
In the case of the air ram being turned away from the direction of travel the result is lessening of the positive pressure that is desirable. In the extreme, a vacuum is caused (i.e. turning the air ram backwards which may cause engine dam age and should only be used over short distances).
The snorkel on its own can only deliver these Improvement in the mid and lower rev range. Where fitted in conjunction with a flat air cleaner element the improvements are in the low rev range only.

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Address: 51 Seven Mile Beach Road, Seven Mile Beach, Tasmania 7170, Australia
Phone: 03 6248 6121 | Email: sales@snorkels.com.au or help@british4wd.com